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Here you will find online publications released by the Military Health System. You can search for a specific publication by either scrolling down the page or entering a keyword in the search box.

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PHCoE Research Gaps Report for PTSD_2016_508

Publication
4/30/2021

PHCoE Research Gaps Report for PTSD

PHCoE Research Gaps Report for Adjustment Disorders_2018_508

Publication
4/29/2021

Research Gaps Report for Adjustment Disorders

PHCoE Research Gaps Report for SUD_2017_508

Publication
4/29/2021

Research Gaps Report for SUD

PHCoE Research Gaps Report for Suicide Prevention Topics_2020_508

Publication
4/29/2021

Research Gaps Report for Suicide Prevention Topics

PHCoE PCBH Behavioral Health Consultant Facilitator BHCF Phase 1 Core Competency Tool 508

Publication
4/28/2021

A certified BHCF Trainer rates the BHCF trainee skill level based on their observations of trainee performance of each dimension. Trainees must demonstrate ability to perform the minimal benchmark behaviors and/or demonstrate the clinical knowledge/skill that is consistent with minimal benchmark. Demonstration of unshaded elements is required to satisfactorily complete training. During initial training, BHCF trainees will be rated on the final training day with the core competency tool during role plays of a warm handoff, 7-10 day contact, and a 4 wee k contact.

PHCoE PCBH Handout BCBT AP Module 4 Cognitive Coping 1 508

Publication
4/28/2021

Experiencing acute pain involves more than the pain itself. Acute pain is best understood as an interaction between the physical components of pain, behaviors, thoughts, and emotions. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Acute Pain (CBT-AP) focuses on these biopsychosocial interactions between thoughts, behaviors, and feelings that impact your acute pain experience. As shown below, all of these pieces affect each other. The aim of this treatment is to help you develop adaptive coping skills so that you feel a greater sense of control over your life and the pain, help you get back into the activities you enjoy, and decrease risk for development of a chronic problem with pain.

PHCoE PCBH Handout BCBT AP Module 5 Cognitive Coping 2 508

Publication
4/28/2021

Thinking about how much pain you are in does not help you cope with the pain. As pain increases, thoughts may become more negative; as thoughts become more negative, pain often increases further. Although pain thoughts can be automatic, with practice you can become more aware when you have them. Then you can replace unhelpful thoughts with ones that are helpful. Here are some examples of unhelpful pain thoughts and some coping statements that you can use to replace them:

PHCoE PCBH Handout BCBT CP Module A Assessment and Goal Setting 508

Publication
4/28/2021

One’s experience of chronic pain involves more than the pain itself. Chronic pain is best understood as an interaction between the physical components of pain, behaviors, thoughts, and emotions. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain (CBT-CP) focuses on these biopsychosocial interactions between thoughts, behaviors, and feelings that impact your chronic pain experience. As shown below, all of these pieces affect each other. The aim of this treatment is to help you develop adaptive coping skills so that you feel a greater sense of control over your life and your pain, and to improve your quality of life despite pain.

PCBH Handout BCBT CP Module B Relaxation Training 1 508

Publication
4/28/2021

Chronic pain touches many parts of your life, and each piece affects others. The interaction between each circle shown here impacts how you feel overall:

PCBH Handout BCBT CP Module C Activities and Pacing 508

Publication
4/28/2021

Try different activities to distract yourself from pain and improve your mood.

PHCoE PCBH Handout BCBT CP Module D Relaxation Training 2 508

Publication
4/28/2021

The technique I am going to help you learn is called progressive muscle relaxation. It involves tensing and relaxing muscle groups throughout your body to bring about a state of relaxation. As I ask you to tense your muscles, only tighten them enough to feel some tension—maybe a third to a half of their fully tense state. Make sure you don't strain yourself or hold your breath when you tense your muscles. The goal is to notice what the muscles feel like when they are tense so you can more fully relax them. I'll have you hold the tension for about five seconds and then ask you to relax. Focus on the sensations of letting go of the tension and study the feelings of the muscle being completely relaxed. We'll have you do that for about a minute before moving on to the next muscle group.

PHCoE PCBH Handout BCBT CP Module E Cognitive Coping 1 508

Publication
4/28/2021

One’s experience of chronic pain involves more than the pain itself. Chronic pain is best understood as an interaction between the physical components of pain, behaviors, thoughts, and emotions. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain (CBT-CP) focuses on these biopsychosocial interactions between thoughts, behaviors, and feelings that impact your chronic pain experience. As shown below, all of these pieces affect each other. The aim of this treatment is to help you develop adaptive coping skills so that you feel a greater sense of control over your life and your pain, and to improve your quality of life despite pain.

PHCoE PCBH Handout BCBT CP Module F Cognitive Coping 2 508

Publication
4/28/2021

One’s experience of chronic pain involves more than the pain itself. Chronic pain is best understood as an interaction between the physical components of pain, behaviors, thoughts, and emotions. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Chronic Pain (CBT-CP) focuses on these biopsychosocial interactions between thoughts, behaviors, and feelings that impact your chronic pain experience. As shown below, all of these pieces affect each other. The aim of this treatment is to help you develop adaptive coping skills so that you feel a greater sense of control over your life and your pain, and to improve your quality of life despite pain.

PHCoE PCBH Handout _BCBT_CP_Module G Pain Action Plan 508

Publication
4/28/2021

People have many challenging situations in their lives and it is expected that certain obstacles will arise. A difficult day may involve life stressors and increased pain symptoms. The best time to plan for how you will best cope with and manage your pain during one of these days is now.

PHCoE PCBH Handout BCBT AP Module 1 Assessment and Education 508

Publication
4/28/2021

Brief Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Acute Pain (CBT-AP) is a biopsychosocial approach (Figure 1) to help address acute pain. Brief CBT-AP aims to decrease distress and disability from pain and assist in returning you to activities your primary care manager (PCM) approved.

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